In this country, window box gardening offers apartment dwellers the enjoyment of container gardening from within or without. If you live in just one room or on a very small property, you, too, can have a window box garden filled in spring with pansies and primroses, in summer with petunias or fuchsias, and in fall with chrysanthemums. In winter, greens and berries, like bittersweet or California pepper berries with pine, give color. English Ivy will provide trailing green all winter if kept out of the wind.

For the best results in a window box gardens, the box ought to be at least three to four feet long but not more than six feet. If larger, it is way too heavy to suspend and secure properly, and it cannot be lifted easily, even by two people. Boxes resting on broad window ledges and on firm porch railings might be eight feet long, but hardly more since moving them becomes too hazardous. Keep to a minimum depth of eight to nine inches, with a width of ten to twelve inches across the top. Of course, lengths must vary according to the window, or series of windows or railing to be decorated with window box gardening.

The most common material for window box gardens is wood. California redwood becomes a neutral gray if not painted, and cypress will last for years. Cedar is recommended, as is a good grade of white pine. Other materials include metals, which are attractive and, for the most part, light in weight.